The Impact on their Families of Children with Special Needs

Some people believe that children with disabilities have negative effects on family life. However, many parents report that their children with special needs bring benefits to their household. The authors of this paper were interested in finding out if having a positive outlook on life is either a way parents cope with stress, or is due to a deep change in the way they think about their child and their family.

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Resilience in Families of Children With Special Needs

Many families of children with special needs deal with child behaviour problems that are stressful and can affect their daily routines. The ability of these families to manage this stress is termed “resilience”. This group of researchers explored whether or not factors like child behaviour problems, levels of social support, and financial hardship might affect their family resilience levels.

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Family Care for Children with Disabilities

Many families living with children with disabilities deal with the hard task of balancing the needs of their child with those of the entire family. In this study, the researchers surveyed parents to find out what influences some families to consider out-of-home placement for their special needs child, while others do not.

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Behaviour Problems and Parenting Stress

Many families of children with special needs face daily challenges. Their child’s behaviour can be difficult, and cause stress for their parents and siblings. The researchers wanted to know if behaviour problems are more severe and more frequent in children with developmental delays compared to children without developmental delays. They also wanted to know if both the mother and father in each family agreed on the severity and stressfulness of these behaviours. The researchers then tried to sort out if the child behaviour caused parental stress, and if parent stress levels also affected child behaviour problems.

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An Analysis Of The Use Of Behavioural Interventions In Children With ADHD

Behavioural interventions often are recommended as treatment for ADHD, even though there is insufficient evidence to show they work well in real life. However, there is enough evidence to support the continuation of research into whether or not they are effective in changing problem behaviour. Since parents have substantial influence on children’s development , this review sought to evaluate published trials of behavioural interventions that measured three key patient and parent outcomes:

• The impact of behavioural interventions on parents’ responses to children with ADHD was investigated.

• The possible improvements in parenting competence, and decrease in mental health problems in adults dealing with children with ADHD.

• The impact of behavioural interventions on other aspects of children’s lives, such as social skills, academic performance, and oppositional behaviours.

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Developmental Pathways of Preschool Children with ASD

Previous studies have shown that the IQ and language ability of children with ASD can predict later outcomes. Two other aspects that have an impact on later outcomes are autistic symptom severity and adaptive functioning, which refers to learning how to perform daily life tasks. This study looked at whether or not information on autistic symptom severity and adaptive functioning could be used to predict developmental outcomes of children with ASD.

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Update on Non-Medication Treatments for Pediatric OCD

The parents of children and young people who have Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) have sometimes don’t want them to use medication. As well, many young people with OCD are unable to take the medication for a variety of reasons. In 2007, researchers looked at whether or not non-medication treatments worked to reduce the symptoms of OCD. That review showed that the best non-medication treatment for OCD in children and youth is Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). CBT is used to help people change the kinds of thinking that makes their symptoms worse. It can be offered to individuals and groups, in person, or online. This updated review looks at studies of many kinds of non-medication treatments for OCD, including the various types of CBT.

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Sleep Disturbances in Rett Syndrome

Sleep problems are very common in girls and women with Rett Syndrome (RS). They lead to fatigue and stress in both the person with Rett and their families and caregivers. Understanding what kind of sleep disturbances are occurring and in which age groups is important for developing successful treatments.

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Challenging Behaviour, Sleep and Anxiety in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and/or Intellectual Disability

Children with Intellectual Disability (ID) and/or Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are more likely to have sleep and anxiety problems, and episodes of challenging behaviour (CB) than are typically developing children. However, there is not much information about how these conditions are related to each other. The goal of this study was to better understand how sleep problems and anxiety are related to CB.

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Sleep and Pediatric Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Sleep problems are common in children with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). However, there is little research on what forms they take and how they relate to the OCD, itself. Since sleep disturbances are known to affect learning ability and mood, it is important to understand if they also affect the symptoms of OCD. It is possible that they may affect the overall functioning of children with the condition.

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