Clear Language Reports

Assessment of Studies of Non-medication Treatment of OCD

Treatment recommendations are only as good as the evidence on which they are based. That is why professional associations review research studies to evaluate how well they have been conducted and analyzed. This is an update of a review published in 2007 that looked at the evidence base for different forms of psychosocial interventions used in children and youth with OCD. That review concluded that the best evidence was for Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). CBT is a form of therapy, offered individually or in groups, that teaches people how to identify and alter thinking patterns that can worsen their symptoms and reduce their ability to function in daily life.

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Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders Share Problems Identifying Emotions

Many children and young people with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDs) have deficits in their ability to recognize the emotional states of others (e.g., anger, fear, or sadness). The goal of this study was to compare patterns of this social perception ability in children diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or autism spectrum disorder (ASD), compared to a control group. The researchers wanted to see if the different groups shared similar difficulties with social perception and if there were differences in their severity.

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Sleep and Pediatric Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Sleep problems are common in children with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). However, there is little research on what forms they take and how they relate to the OCD, itself. Since sleep disturbances are known to affect learning ability and mood, it is important to understand if they also affect the symptoms of OCD. It is possible that they may affect the overall functioning of children with the condition.

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Update on Non-Medication Treatments for Pediatric OCD

The parents of children and young people who have Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) have sometimes don’t want them to use medication. As well, many young people with OCD are unable to take the medication for a variety of reasons. In 2007, researchers looked at whether or not non-medication treatments worked to reduce the symptoms of OCD. That review showed that the best non-medication treatment for OCD in children and youth is Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). CBT is used to help people change the kinds of thinking that makes their symptoms worse. It can be offered to individuals and groups, in person, or online. This updated review looks at studies of many kinds of non-medication treatments for OCD, including the various types of CBT.

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